Croydon Ducks - Crystal Palace Park - 2011

Latest update: 4th November 2011

External Links: Council Information  Park Map  Goggle Map   Wikipedia

Crystal Palace Park, on the top of Sydenham Hill, just north of Croydon is one of the oldest in London.  Although the park is I40
acres, it is heavily developed with the National Sports Centre athletics stadium and swimming pool splitting the park in two, with
many other buildings and structures, and parts of the park are often closed off for special events such as car rallies.


There are car parks accessed off the Anerley Road, up the hill from Elmers End Road, near Crystal Palace Station.  There is also
road parking much nearer the lake in Thicket Road at the southern edge of the park. Closed at night.

The southern end of the park has a series of lakes and ponds, heavily landscaped with paths and bridges, and with 33 concrete
prehistoric monsters created 150 years ago.  There are a lot of water fowl, but sparsely spread between the different ponds.
There is another lake in the concert bowl in the north of the park.

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Wide shot of lower park and play area at Crystal Palace Park.

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The lower ponds and lake have extensive mature landscaping, with the path mostly several feet from the water's edge.

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A few Mallards on the pond, with a concrete monster on the far side of the water.

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Another Coot nest in the water, with more monsters.

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30th May 2011, wide shot taken from the Geological Bridge, with water cascading down several levels from a stream the the lower
pond,  There are Mallards in the foreground, and a Heron looking for fish in the lower pond, with monsters in the distance.

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More monsters.

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Ditto.

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Some water fowl, a Mallard and Moorhen.

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Wide shot showing various well used paths in the distance.

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The lower boating lake, originally a reservoir for the extensive fountains and water features higher up the hill in the park, with a few water
fowl.

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Feeding ducks is not easy due to the distance of the path from the water, but this Mallard knows this and climbed out of the water to
get closer to the path for some food.  Surprised at how hungry she is, considering the hundreds of people walking around these ponds. 

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The lower lake again.

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A beach area at the end of the lake, with a family of Coots, a Canada Goose and lots of pigeons.

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The Coot nest seems much greener than most, one of the young Coots being fed by mother.


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