Croydon Ducks - Waddon Ponds - 2011

Latest update: 12th December 2012

External Links: Council Information  Google Map  Croydon RSPB River Wandle Trust 

Waddon Ponds is an eight acre park off the Purley Way, next to John Lewis, surrounded by housing.  There are long ponds, gardens and a
playground.   The ponds are fed by springs which are the source of the River Wandle, which runs buried though Croydon and eventually to
the Thames via other parks, including Morden Hall Park. 


Best parking is in The Ridgeway or Waddon Close Road, both off Croydon Road in Waddon, near the railway station. There are entrances
in other roads, including Mill Lane, next to John Lewis. Closed at night.

There are lot of water fowl, including mute swans and a large number of coots. Nesting boxes are provided on stilts in the water. The water
 fowl live both on and off the water, and wander around the lawns and gardens waiting to fed. The large number of water fowl suggest they
are well looked after by park visitors.

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Long shot of Waddon Ponds taken from Mill Lane, a lot of trees overhang the ponds, but many of the Weeping Willows seem to have
be cut down.

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The other end of Waddon Ponds, with duck and geese nesting boxes sitting in the water.

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15 May 2011, Coot sitting on her nest, with three youngsters.  Although most of the pond has clear water some areas, such as around
this nest, are more stagnant with a lot of debris in the water. 

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A Canada Geese nesting in an old tree.

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More Canada Geese, with a single gosling, probably just a few days old.  There is grass around most of the pond, with some planting,
then a low fenced path to stop dogs chasing the ducks, and many of the wild fowl prefer the grass to the water, and will chase after food.

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The young gosling again.

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Unlike any other ponds and lakes we've seen, Waddon Ponds encourages breeding with several nesting boxes in the water. Different
Canada Geese again with a gosling.

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Just a few feet away from the foot path, a Canada Goose sitting on a nest made from down and feathers.

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15 May 2011, the mother Coot with one of the young in the foreground, and a Mallard mother five ducklings, probably about two weeks old.

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Some of path is unfenced so next to the pond, but dogs must be kept on leads.  Seen here is a large flock of Coots, probably 20
or 30.

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Another Coot nest, with the flock of Coots currently on the far side of the pond.

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Canada Geese and the Mill Lane at the end of the ponds.

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Two Mute Swans sitting in the shade.

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Another Coot family.

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A Tufted Duck.

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On the other side of the pond now, with the large flock of Coots.

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And some Mallards sitting quietly by the pond edge.

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Another of the Waddon Ponds, much clearer water than some areas, with several bird nesting boxes in the distance, and a Coots
nest in the foreground.

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16th July 2011, this pond was almost empty when we arrived in the rain, but the sight of food was sufficient for the Canada Geese from
the lawns beyond to all amble into the water and swim across. 

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Fewer geese on the pond, lots of Mallards and Tufted Ducks.

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Two Mallard boys still with greenish heads, but having lost all their grey feathers and now speckled brown like the females.

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Around the corner, a bridge separates this pond from the main long pond.

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The Swans are still on the main pond, with many more Mallards.

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Coots on the lawn beside the pond.

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More Coots and male mallards less their grey spring coats.

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This area of the main pond seems to be home to dozens of Coots, that swim back and forward between the two sides of the pond
depending on which park visitors are feeding them.

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A Coot family just off the path.

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One Moorhen and Coots, probably more Moorhens in the bushes.

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A Greylag Goose, common at Kelsey Park but not often seen here.

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The long pond, Mill Lane and John Lewis in the distance.

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Some beautiful trees surrounding the pond, but fewer than in the past.

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The Coots in the distance.

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The Swans eating from the bottom of the pond, with the bridge to the smaller pond in the distance. Mallard ducklings are hiding under
the trees on the far side of the pond.

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A Mallard family on the far side of the pond, one duckling in the water with mother.

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Canada Geese dozing on the lawn.

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More Canada Geese dozing around the small pond.

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25th September 2011, looking north up the main lake, the water quality is excellent here, in the past it's

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Lots of geese and pigeons waiting to be fed on the grass.

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Looking south down the main lake.

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The full range of wild fowl on the lake, Mallards, Canada Geese and Coots.

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The largest population of Coots in Croydon.

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The Coots again, following us down the lake.

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At the far end of the lake, a single Domestic Duck.  But the swans have gone elsewhere.

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Various Mallards and Coots sheltering under a collapsed tree.

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December 2011, like most of the other parks, noisy sea birds have arrived in large numbers.  Must be really annoying for the residents
living around the park, particularly when they are fighting for food.  The Mallards are not amused.

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Mallards and Canada Geese looking for food on the grass, during the summer it was only geese out of the water.

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Again the sea birds are fighting the resident water fowl for food.

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Further down the pond, the large number of Coots seem more successful at keeping the sea birds away.

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The birds are following us down the pond, waiting for more food.

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Even  the Canada Geese are coming under the tree for food.

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Probably a Mallard, but with a white front.

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Canada Geese have taken over one of the lawns.


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