Croydon Ducks - Waddon Ponds - 2012

Latest update: 12th December 2012

External Links: Council Information  Google Map  Croydon RSPB River Wandle Trust 

Waddon Ponds is an eight acre park off the Purley Way, next to John Lewis, surrounded by housing.  There are long ponds, gardens and a
playground.   The ponds are fed by springs which are the source of the River Wandle, which runs buried though Croydon and eventually to
the Thames via other parks, including Morden Hall Park. 


Best parking is in The Ridgeway or Waddon Court Road (CR0 4AG for satnavs), both off Croydon Road in Waddon, near the railway
station. There are entrances in other roads, including Mill Lane, next to John Lewis. Closed at night.

There are lot of water fowl, including mute swans and a large number of coots. Nesting boxes are provided on stilts in the water. The water
 fowl live both on and off the water, and wander around the lawns and gardens waiting to fed. The large number of water fowl suggest they
are well looked after by park visitors.

Older Photos of Waddon Ponds

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The main Waddon Pond seen from near John Lewis. 

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12th February 2012, snow covers most of the park grass, and ice much of the ponds.  But still a large number of ducks and sea birds,
some geese on the grass behind this small pond.

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Several Mallards walking on ice at the pond edge, Coots in the water.

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There is substantial maintenance work going on during the winter, although not while pond is covered in ice and snow.  The excavator
has been dredging mud from the bottom of the pond.

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The only ice free area is the far end of the pond near John Lewis, but some birds are still looking for food on the frozen parts.  The line
of posts are part of the maintenance, creating a new pond bank.

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No idea why this Ring-necked Parakeet (or parrot) is sitting in the middle of the ice, but it did fly off so not stuck.

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Most of the pond activity is down near the ice free area of the pond, lots of Coots looking for food, and a few Mallards.

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One Mallard, three Tufted Ducks and several Coots, on the ice. 

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Vast numbers of sea birds, as at all the parks.

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The other end of the main pond with the dredging excavator on it's raft.

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Perhaps the grass is warmer then the snow.

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25th March 2012, there are dozens of Coots on the various lawns, instead of on the water, not seen this before, but a later photo
shows why.

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This Canada Goose was hissing as I got closer, protecting it's mate sitting on the raised bank of earth behind, her nest.

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One pair of swans in this park as well.

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The renovation work is still underway, the line of posts across the pond will become a goose barrier to provide protection for ducklings,
not sure how.  They have also built a Kingfisher nesting bank in the middle of the pond.

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Possibly a Little Grebe, but not a good photo, kept swimming under the branches and away from the camera.

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A Coot sitting on her nest.

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This part of the main pond is where the dozens of Coots normally live, but the builders have been in and constructed a new viewing
platform, which probably explains why the Coots have taken up residence on the lawns instead.  Now the new platform is finished,
hopefully they will reclaim the pond.

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Several nesting platforms have been added, one of which these Coots have taken over.

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The new Kingfisher nesting bank in the centre of the pond.

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Close up of the new Kingfisher nesting bank, built from dredged materials, currently occupied by geese.

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The smaller pond at top of the park, seems to have been partially drained for maintenance, normally a lot of birds here.

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13th April 2012, construction work still going on, a line of stakes for the goose barrier across the pond.

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A second smaller viewing platform has been installed.

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The new much large viewing platform, the pond is relatively quiet with all the winter sea birds having left and not many geese.

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Long view of the quiet pond, with two new islands.

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One of the islands has a successful nest.

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Mallards and one goose looking for food.

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Two more of the new islands with the new Kingfisher nesting bank in the background.

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The smaller pond is almost dry, possibly because it's fed by a buried stream in another nearby park currently without a pond, but where
work is currently going on to create an open stream and pond. 

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Large numbers of Coots are still living on the grass (in the distance) while work is undertaken in the pond.

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1st June 2012, the first Canada Goose family with five goslings, waiting for passers by on the main path.

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But they follow us over to the pond looking for more food, with  several Coots.

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One Coot on her nest in the small pond.

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The goslings are now on the water.

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Vew looking north up the main pond, no new building work since our last visit, just a row of posts across the pond.

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The second goose family, four much large goslings heading our way for food.

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And one Mallard family with six ducklings, about a week old.

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The second goose family again.

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And now about to leave the pond.

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Looking south down the main pond, not much action here today.

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A Coot feeding her chick.

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Another Coot with four chicks still in the nest.

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The Coot mother seems to have more eggs in the nest, despite the four chicks she is already looking after.

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1st July 2012, the goslings are now about five weeks old.   

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Virtually all the Canada Geese are on the lawns at the bottom the park, probably due to the construction work that has been
done in the main ponds.

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New fences have gone up around the main ponds, one fence in the water, a second on the grass, with new marginal planting betweeen
them.  Without the fences, the plants would simply become duck food very quickly.

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A Moorhen looking after her two chicks, balanced on an old fence in the water.

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Now two of them have moved to an old branch.

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Some of the new fences around the main pond, which include some circular areas presumably with special planting.  The contractors
must have used a mile of chicken wire.

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There are very few birds on the main ponds, still getting used to the new fences. 

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Some Mallards near the new viewing platform.

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The fences are causing problems for some families, two Coot chicks are stuck on the border side of the fence, and can not get back
through to mother.

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Finally one chick squeezes though the mesh and joins the family, but the second chick still can not find a hole large enough.  Near
here there is a passage from the water to the grass for geese and ducks to exit the water.

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Another Coot nest with two chicks.

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September 2012, Lucy having a quick paddle.

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A Moorhen family.

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A Coot family, with Mallards and geese trying to get their food.

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The end of the main lake, a few Mallards down here.

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The new plants are growing protected by the netting, plenty of Canada Geese here today.

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November 2012, the lower pond, mix  of Canada Geese, Mallards, Coots and Moorhens.

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Lots of Coots on the grass (and my shadown) but the pigeons get to any food too quickly.

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Quiet of lot of fighting between the geese.

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Sun is low in the sky so washed out photos.  Plenty of ducks waiting for food by the bridge.

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The Mute Swans are still here, and hungry.

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The new planting is growing slowly, but it was a cool spring and summer so nothing spectacular.

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The Coots used to live around this part of the long pond, but don't seem to like all the new fences.

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Very quiet in the centre of the pond and the new Kingfisher nesting bank looks very lonely.


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